Materials – And Why They Matter

Some of the differences between high-quality and lower-quality art materials may be immediately evident; others differences appear over time.  In order to minimize the risk of fading, warping or other degradation of your original artwork, it’s critical that only the best materials be used.

Here’s some information on the materials Jerrie Yehling uses for her fish reproductions; feel free to e-mail jerrieyehling@att.net with any questions.

Pencil Drawings

Brook Trout - Pencil
+ click to enlarge

Brook Trout - Pencil

All pencil drawings are made with Derwent Coloursoft pencils with the highest ratings on the Blue Wool Scale for lightfastness.   Only pencils which are considered permanently lightfast are used.  This is an important consideration when purchasing art, as many colored pencils and watercolors are rated poorly for lightfastness, and will fade noticeably with the passage of time.

Ordinary precautions, such as hanging away from natural light, should be followed with any original artwork, but drawings made with the most lightfast materials will remain vivid and true.

The eyes of the fish are enhanced with 23K soluble gold.

The paper is Strathmore 500 series 4-ply Bristol Board, which is a heavy, stiff paper that does not ripple or warp.  Unlike many papers and boards, Strathmore 500 series Bristol Board is made of 100% cotton fibers and is acid-free.  Its rigidity makes it ideal for framing.

Oil Paintings

Golden Trout - Oil
+ click to enlarge

Golden Trout - Oil

Oil paintings are created with top-quality paint (Blockx, made in Belgium and Art Spectrum, made in Australia) and Blockx amber medium which adds brilliance, strength without brittleness, and permanence to the paint.

The canvas is stretched linen, which performs significantly better over time than the cheaper stretched cotton canvases often used for paintings.

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